MORE THAN 9,300 FERAL HOGS ELIMINATED FROM MISSOURI IN 2018

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has tallied up feral hog elimination numbers from January through December 2018. The final number is 9,365 feral hogs removed from the state’s landscape by MDC, partner agencies, and private landowners. In 2017, 6,561 feral hogs were removed. MDC and partners have implemented a new strategy to feral hog elimination, dividing the areas where feral hogs are present into elimination areas 1 through 6. Trapping is currently ongoing in each zone. Zone one, near the Harry S. Truman Reservoir and Stockton Lake, is benefiting from a significantly reduced population of feral hogs. The goal continues to be complete elimination of feral hogs from Missouri. In 2017, MDC, the Corps of Engineers, and the LAD Foundation established regulations against feral hog hunting on lands owned and managed by these three organizations.  Other agencies have passed regulations similar to MDC’s to eliminate hog hunting on land they own. When neighboring landowners try to control feral hogs through hunting, the hogs simply travel back and forth between the properties, escaping and causing more damage.  Trapping with no hunting interference is the best method to eliminate them. Landowners can seek help from MDC and USDA such as technical advice, on-site visits, loaning equipment and training. Feral hogs are not wildlife and are a serious threat to fish, forests and wildlife as well as agricultural resources. Feral hogs damage property, agriculture, and natural resources by their aggressive rooting of soil in addition to their trampling and consumption of crops as part of their daily search for food. Feral hogs have expanded their range in the U.S. from 17 to 38 states over the past 30 years. Their populations grow rapidly because feral hogs can breed any time of year and produce two litters of one to seven piglets every 12 to 15 months. Feral hogs are also known to carry diseases such as swine brucellosis, pseudo rabies, trichinosis and leptospirosis, which are a threat to Missouri agriculture and human health.

 

 

 

 

Photo Gallery